Sapphire - Kashmir, Burma and Ceylon Blue


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One carat unheated Burma sapphires are more difficult to obtain than larger sapphires. The 1.04 blue sapphire is a desirable, electric color at 65% blue. The tone is a perfect 75 tone, which means the stone never blacks-out. The gem is MI1-MI1 clarity grade. The cutting and finish are typical for a stone cut in Mogok. The depth is 75.9% with a 65% brilliancy. This gem would be beautiful mounted or a great gemstone for a collector on a budget.
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Carat sized unheated gem Burma sapphires are almost impossible to buy. This stone is a vivid color at 70% blue. The tone is a light 85 tone or 80-85, or technically an 82.5. The Burmese inclusions are deep within the stone and saturated color makes makes them difficult to see. If you look closely on the top of the gem you should see a natural. Naturals are incorporated into the clarity grades by AGL. The stone has good cutting and finish and an ultra-high 80-90% brilliancy. This gem would be beautiful mounted or a great gemstone for a collector.
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One carat unheated Burma sapphires are more difficult to obtain than larger sapphires. The 1.22 blue sapphire is a desirable, electric color at 65% blue. The tone is a perfect 75 tone, which means the stone never blacks-out. This is the best tone for mounting these gems. The gem is pretty clean at L2-MI1 clarity grade. The cutting and finish are typical for a stone cut in Mogok. The depth is slightly deep at 84% with a 60-70% brilliancy. This gem would be beautiful mounted or a great gemstone for a collector on a budget.
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Although the AGL does not state origin on this 1985 document because they just started around this time period (mid-1980's), we remember when Ceylon sapphires were the most commonly traded sapphire gemstone at that time. Top color, one carat, 3.5 Ceylon sapphires hit their highest price in 1981 at approximately US$4000 per carat. In the last 30 years, the price action for this country of origin has been sideways to down. This stone is an intense gem at 70% blue with high brilliancy. It may be an interesting choice to start a small collection or if you need a relatively inexpensive gemstone for jewelry. Report signed personally by Cap. Many consider this a collector's item, too.
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A nice two carat "Classic" Mogok no heat Burma sapphire. The color is a desirable, intense blue color at 70% blue. The tone is 80, which means the stone is a rich color. The gem is MI1-MI2 clarity grade which proves the stone is Burma and no heat. The gem has been recut several times to obtain high numbers for a gem from Mogok. The depth is ideal at 73.8% with a high 70% brilliancy. This gem would be beautiful mounted or a great gemstone for a collector.
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One of few gems to ever get an ultra rare 3 color because it's 75% primary color under the old AGL grading standards. You will probably never see another sapphire as blue as this rock. The tone is 85, but the tone is 80-85, which means it's a light 85. The gem is clean at LI2-MI1 clarity grade. That means you probably cannot see any inclusions with your eyes. The cutting and finish not typical for a stone cut in Mogok. This stone was recut by a master. The stone is slightly deep at 85.3% but has an almost unheard of 90% brilliancy. This gem would be beautiful mounted or a great gemstone for a collector who wants the best.
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A collectors Classic Mogok Burma sapphire back for liquidation. The Burmese gemstone is a 4.5 color and 75 tone. This is one of our favorite color combinations because these gems never black-out and look fantastic in all lights, even at night. The clarity is very clean at LI2-MI1. The stone has a very high 70-80% brilliancy. The stone has better cutting and finish numbers than normal Burmese gem. The Total Quality Integration (TQR) is Very Good. This stone is highly desirable and bargain priced. Perfect for a portfolio or would be serious mounted.
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A beautiful no excuses 70% primary color gem blue "Classic" Mogok sapphire with 70 tone back from a collector. This is very rare, a stone with vivid blue color and a lighter tone. Means the stone will never black out and look great in all lights-even bad restaurant lights. The 9.59 is super clean at LI2 clarity grade. That means you cannot see any inclusions with your eyes. The cutting and finish are vastly superior to most gems cut in Mogok. The stone could have been "native cut" and remained over 10 carats. Someone took a serious weight loss for these top cut and finish numbers. The stone has an ideal depth and a high 70%-80% brilliancy. Naturally, the gem is not heated. All these factors go into the Excellent to Very Good or 2.5 TQIR grade. A serious collector piece or amazing stone set in jewelry.
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Ultra-rare killer blue color Star Sapphire back for liquidation. An old AGL report signed by C.R. Beesley. Many consider this document to be a collectible, too. How rare are these stones? "For every 100 faceted corundum (ruby and sapphire) mined, approximately three stars are discovered. One will have good color and a bad star. One will have a great star and bad color. Only one out of a hundred will have a good star and good color. Fine stars are rarer than rare." Gemstone Forecaster, Volume 16, #2, 1998. The six milky white legs of the star are sharp and obvious. The gem is translucent. Of course, these stones are not heated. When heated, these stone do not star. Until 50 years ago, these stones alway sold for more than faceted Burma sapphire. Imagine trying to buy a ten carat faceted Burma sapphire for about $4400 per carat anywhere in the world today. Not going to happen. The ultimate connoisseur gemstone, plus would look fantastic mounted.