Sapphire - Burma and Ceylon Blue


#
One carat unheated Burma sapphires are more difficult to obtain than larger sapphires. The 1.04 blue sapphire is a desirable, electric color at 65% blue. The tone is a perfect 75 tone, which means the stone never blacks-out. The gem is MI1-MI1 clarity grade. The cutting and finish are typical for a stone cut in Mogok. The depth is 75.9% with a 65% brilliancy. This gem would be beautiful mounted or a great gemstone for a collector on a budget. Click here for more information.
#
Carat sized unheated gem Burma sapphires are almost impossible to buy. This stone is a vivid color at 70% blue. The tone is a light 85 tone or 80-85, or technically an 82.5. The Burmese inclusions are deep within the stone and saturated color makes makes them difficult to see. If you look closely on the top of the gem you should see a natural. Naturals are incorporated into the clarity grades by AGL. The stone has good cutting and finish and an ultra-high 80-90% brilliancy. This gem would be beautiful mounted or a great gemstone for a collector. Click here for more information.
#
One carat unheated Burma sapphires are more difficult to obtain than larger sapphires. The 1.22 blue sapphire is a desirable, electric color at 65% blue. The tone is a perfect 75 tone, which means the stone never blacks-out. This is the best tone for mounting these gems. The gem is pretty clean at L2-MI1 clarity grade. The cutting and finish are typical for a stone cut in Mogok. The depth is slightly deep at 84% with a 60-70% brilliancy. This gem would be beautiful mounted or a great gemstone for a collector on a budget. Click here for more information.
#
A nice two carat "Classic" Mogok no heat Burma sapphire. The color is a desirable, intense blue color at 70% blue. The tone is 80, which means the stone is a rich color. The gem is MI1-MI2 clarity grade which proves the stone is Burma and no heat. The gem has been recut several times to obtain high numbers for a gem from Mogok. The depth is ideal at 73.8% with a high 70% brilliancy. This gem would be beautiful mounted or a great gemstone for a collector. Click here for more information.
#
An old Burma stone back for liquidation from a collector. It has the original AGL document that many of our clients prefer. Even signed by Cap Beesley. This is a top gem at 70% blue. The color/tone is 3.5/80. The color rating below is 75-80, meaning it's a light 80. The gem is MI1-MI2 clarity grade. That means you probably can probably see inclusions with your eyes, although nothing stands out in the video. The cutting and finish are exceptional for a stone cut in Mogok. It means the stone was recut by a professional, probably losing a great deal of weight. The stone is has a perfect 71.3% depth and high 60-70% brilliancy. The TQIR is Excellent to Very Good or 2.5. This gem would be beautiful mounted or a serious gemstone for a collector. Click here for more information.
#
An old Burma stone back for liquidation from a collector. It has the original AGL document that many of our clients prefer. This combination of color and tone is one of our favorites. The color/tone is 4.5/75. This combination is perfect for mounting. The color of the stone will look a step deeper blue and never "black out" due to it's perfect tone. This stone will pop in bad restaurant lights. The gem is clean at LI2-MI1 clarity grade. That means you probably cannot see any inclusions with your eyes. The cutting and finish are good for a stone cut in Mogok. The stone is has an 82.3% depth and high 70-80% brilliancy. This gem would be beautiful mounted or a great gemstone for a collector. Click here for more information.
#
Since unheated Burma and Kashmir sapphires are becoming so difficult to obtain, it makes sense to diversify with other sources. Since 95%+ of all Ceylons are heated, this is a rare gem. This is a collector's stone back for liquidation. The gemstone is a 4.5 color with an (ECA) of 4, or the stone is a split grade of 4.25. Since the TQIR is 3.5, the final grade is 3.75. The gem is 65% blue and perfect 75 tone. This stone never blacks out. The MI1 is primarily rutile (evidence of no heat). Perfect depth and good proportions, finish, and high brilliancy. This stone may be an excellent diversification for an unheated gemstone collection or a serious piece mounted in jewelry. A fine gemstone priced under the market. Click here for more information.
#
This is a collector's gem Burma sapphire back for liquidation. Some argue this is the best rich vivid color/tone of Burma sapphires at 3.5/80. The gem is an electric blue color at 70% blue and medium dark 80 tone. The LI1-MI1 clarity means you probably cannot see any inclusions with your eyes. Excellent depth of 76.2% and the average brilliancy is high 80%. The rock has Good (5) proportions and Good (4-5) Finish. The fact the AGL called the Total Quality Integration Rating (TQIR) Excellent or 1.5 means the lab agrees this is a special stone. This stone may be an excellent diversification for an unheated Burma collection or a serious piece mounted in jewelry. A gem gem. Click here for more information.
#
A beautiful no excuses 70% primary color gem blue "Classic" Mogok sapphire with 70 tone back from a collector. This is very rare, a stone with vivid blue color and a lighter tone. Means the stone will never black out and look great in all lights-even bad restaurant lights. The 9.59 is super clean at LI2 clarity grade. That means you cannot see any inclusions with your eyes. The cutting and finish are vastly superior to most gems cut in Mogok. The stone could have been "native cut" and remained over 10 carats. Someone took a serious weight loss for these top cut and finish numbers. The stone has an ideal depth and a high 70%-80% brilliancy. Naturally, the gem is not heated. All these factors go into the Excellent to Very Good or 2.5 TQIR grade. A serious collector piece or amazing stone set in jewelry. Click here for more information.
#
Ultra-rare killer blue color Star Sapphire back for liquidation. An old AGL report signed by C.R. Beesley. Many consider this document to be a collectible, too. How rare are these Burma stones? "For every 100 faceted corundum (ruby and sapphire) mined, approximately three stars are discovered. One will have good color and a bad star. One will have a great star and bad color. Only one out of a hundred will have a good star and good color. Fine stars are rarer than rare." Gemstone Forecaster, Volume 16, #2, 1998. The six milky white legs of the star are sharp and obvious. The gem is translucent. Of course, these stones are not heated. When heated, these stone do not star. Until 50 years ago, these stones alway sold for more than faceted Burma sapphire. Imagine trying to buy a ten carat faceted top gem Burma sapphire for about $9000 per carat anywhere in the world today. Not going to happen because they trade for over $30,000 per carat. The ultimate connoisseur gemstone, plus would look fantastic mounted. Click here for more information.