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An old Jedi or day glow hot pink Burma spinel back from a collector. This stone puts the new production of African spinels to shame. Burma spinels rarely come any pinker. This AGL document was signed by Cap Beesley. We always argued about pink stones. He believes pinks are desaturated reds. Technically true, it always seemed to me pink stones were devalued in the AGL system. The color scan shows the stone is 60% red with a light 65 tone. When I look at this stone, all I see is pink. Clarity is good at LI2-MI1. The stone has a high 70% brilliancy. The cutting and finish are typical Burmese standards. If this stone was an unheated Classic Burma ruby it could sell for over $20,000 per carat. This gem is attractively priced at about 10% of an unheated Classic Burma ruby. This is a gem for a true spinel connoisseur or could be mounted in a killer ring.
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A rare, not treated Burma spinel back for liquidation from a collector. In the old days, these stones were described as "day glow" or "fluorescent". They are known today as "hot" pinks. Of course, they generally come with lighter tones of 60. This means they look good in all lights and never "black-out". The AGL document doesn't have a color scan but refers to the ColorScan Card 299. That card represents the transition point between ruby and pink sapphire. These are desirable colors in ruby or spinel. The clarity is MI1-MI2. The proportions and finish are both good. The depth is 66.4 and the gem has a 60% brilliancy. These "electric" pink spinels" don't show up very often anymore. A serious gemstone for a portfolio or to mount in an upscale jewelry piece.
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A serious "stoplight red" gemstone. This stone puts the new production of African spinels to shame. Burma spinels do not come any redder. The color scan shows the stone is 95% red/orange coupled with a light 70 tone. The stone as MI2 inclusions, which seems to be common in these ultra-saturated Burma spinels. The stone was cut shallow and looks like a 3 1/2 carter. The stone has a slight window as evidenced by the 50-60% brilliancy. The cutting and finish are typical Burmese standards. If this stone was an unheated Classic Burma ruby it could sell for over $70,000 per carat. This gem is attractively priced at less than 10% of an unheated Classic Burma ruby. This is a gem for a true spinel connoisseur or could be mounted in a killer ring. AGL grading report signed by Cap.
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A rare Burma stone back for liquidation. The stone is primarily purple and the tone is medium-dark. The clarity is lightly included. The stone has high brilliancy and good cutting and finish. This gem is attractively priced to sell. This is a gem for a spinel collector on a budget or could be mounted in a ring.
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One of the largest color change spinels on the market. The blue is similar to a light blue sapphire and the purple is similar to an amethyst. This stone is ultra-rare. The majority of the value of any color change stone is the color change. According to AGL, color change is strong and the quality of the change is excellent. No need to use your imagination with this stone, the color change is obvious. Further, the color tone is 3/75. This means the stone is top color and perfect tone. The colors are vivid and the stone never "black-out." The clarity is MI1, so you can see some inclusions in the rock. The proportions and finish are extremely high at Excellent to Very Good. You rarely see these numbers from a stone from Asia. The depth is 78% and the brilliancy is 100%, or the same as a round diamond! Finally, the stone has the coveted excellent TQIR. Lastly, the stone has no clarity treatment or enhancement. The gem has also been graded by GRS. It contains the special comment, "A spinel of excellent clarity and brilliancy, with this color of low tone and pastel to medium saturation, combined with play of color due to dispersion is very rare. The play of color is achieved by a combination of an excellent cutting style and well-balanced proportions." See this comment in the link below. A 25.79 color change spinel recently sold for almost $9000 per carat at auction in Hong Kong, December, 2015. A fascinating gemstone to collect or a different stone to mount in jewelry.